All posts by Phoebe Morad

How do you bring up climate change in church?

There are so many examples from our brothers and sisters across the nation sharing exciting and authentic ways of conversing about climate and making ripples of action as church in the world:

Ideas for Reducing your Impact as a Church or Individually

Thanks to our friends from New Hope Lutheran Church in Columbia, MD via Charlie Bailey. If you have updates or want to add suggestions contact us!

Reusable mesh produce bags. With some grant funding from the Synod’s Creation Care Ministry we are purchasing reusable mesh produce bags and are planning to give one to any congregational family that wants one.  We are going to include a fact sheet in each bag with information about single use plastic. For instance, did you know that Americans use 100 billion plastic bags a year, which require 12 million barrels of oil to manufacture. See other facts here: https://bit.ly/3btedjj We intend to either give them out when we get back to in person services or by placing them in a bin in front of the church for people to come by and pick up at their convenience.

Communion cups. We have found a source for biodegradable/compostable communion cups (link below). We have not purchased any yet given we have a fairly large supply of existing plastic ones and we plan to use those up versus throwing them out. But next time we make a purchase we intend to check these out.

https://www.churchpartner.com/product/41052/thee-friendliest-communion-cup-box-of-2000/

Reduce/eliminate junk mail. My brother is a rabid anti-junk mail freak. He sent me the info below, much of which I have already done and it works.

This is a good overview article and includes some alarming statistics about the amount of junk mail we produce in the US:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/how-to-stop-junk-mail-and-save-trees–and-your-sanity/2018/02/12/6000e4c4-05d9-11e8-b48c-b07fea957bd5_story.html

Direct Marketers Association do not mail list.  Must be renewed every 10 years.  Allows separate opt out for Credit Offers, Catalogs, Magazine Offers (this includes subscription offers, newsletters, periodicals and other promotional mailings), and Other Mail Offers (this includes donation requests, bank offers, retail promotions and more).  To permanently opt out of the credit card offers, you have to fill out a form and send via US mail, which is what I did.  If you have registered before, you can login and see how much longer you have on the list before you have to re-register.  When I signed in recently, close to my renewal date, it automatically renewed my opt-out for an additional 10 years, until 2030.  You can include as many names for a given address as you want (e.g. You, Lois, Carol Buck, etc.)

www.DMAchoice.org

Do Not Call Registry (for phone calls)

www.donotcall.gov

VALPAK

https://www.valpak.com/coupons/show/mailinglistsuppression

The Green Foundation of Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg

Geothermal Comes to the Battlefield

By Delaney Schlake (M. Div Middler, Trinity Lutheran Seminary)

150 years ago, the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg (LTSG) figured prominently into the story of the Civil War. Pickett’s charge was inaugurated on Seminary Ridge, and the cupola of the seminary building itself served as a lookout point for both the North and South at different junctures throughout the battle. Gettysburg has seen its fair share of historical moments, becoming woven into the fiber of American identity, culminating in the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in November 2013.

By 2013, it seems that the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg is making history again–this time, through a literally groundbreaking installation of geothermal technology on their historic campus.

When asked about the process by which the possibility of geothermal energy was approached, the Rev. John Spangler (Executive assistant to the president for communication and planning at LTSG) says that it became clear that the seminary needed to think about some sustainable solutions to the recurring maintenance problems with the 100+ year old steam heating system. Instead of continuing to fix the ancient boilers as they repeatedly broke, Rev. Spangler and a group of ecologically and economically minded dreamers came up with the idea of implementing geothermal energy at Gettysburg.

The geological landscape of Gettysburg, PA is very rich in shale, making it viable ground for geothermal wells to be dug and the seminary to begin heating some of its buildings with geothermal energy. (Learn more about how geothermal works here: http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_energy/our-energy-choices/renewable-energy/how-geothermal-energy-works.html.)

The first two buildings to use geothermal heat pumps for the HVAC systems include the Seminary’s historic chapel as well as Schmucker Hall, which has since become a Seminary Ridge history museum, named for seminary founder and important German-American Lutheran theologian, Samuel Schmucker.

The seminary began this process of converting to geothermal with feasibility studies spanning from 2007-2008, embarking on the installation of geothermal heating in the chapel during 2011. The work in the chapel took approximately four months, followed by a year of rehabilitation and geothermal work in Schmucker.

When asked how the seminary was able to fund such an expansive overhaul of century-old technology, Spangler shared that the seminary had recently engaged in a capital campaign, raising one million dollars for the chapel renovation project. Through state and federal grants, donations, and tax credits, LTSG was able to update both the chapel and Schmucker Hall for just shy of twenty million dollars.

Spangler is optimistic about this formidable investment Gettysburg has made in geothermal energy, asserting that the money saved on energy costs will surprisingly quickly re-coup the money spent on installation. On the heels of this innovation and success, LTSG hopes to expand their use of geothermal energy across more of their 52 acre and 25 building campus.

It is clear that Gettysburg is faithfully responding to the questions around what it means to engage in a Spirit-led, Gospel-rooted love of creation through their work in geothermal energy. Spangler was sure to mention that this movement of the Holy Spirit is not only taking place at Gettysburg, but Wartburg Seminary (Dubuque, IA) as well. Wartburg has also faithfully engaged in the process of implementing geothermal energy as a sustainable, responsible method of heating their buildings.

Gettysburg is deeply entrenched in the conversation around eco-justice and eco-spirituality, as evidenced by more than just their implementation of geothermal energy. The Seminary has engaged in a number of projects based in identifying and reducing their carbon footprint, as well as the myriad methods of academic engagement offered, including courses like Ecology and Religion and EcoTheology in Northern Appalachia, both taught by the Rev. Dr. Gilson Waldkoenig.

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg is also involved in conversations around ecology and faith through Blessed Earth Seminary Stewardship Alliance, GreenFaith: Interfaith Partners for the Environment, and Lutherans Restoring Creation.

Because of their efforts to find sustainable, innovative ways to update their campus and respond to the ecological crisis, Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg is a visible manifestation of all that God is doing in reconciling the world and gathering all of creation ever closer to Godself.


Spring 2012

STUDENT INITIATIVE AND COURSE LEADS TO BENCHMARK CALCULATION OF GETTYSBURG SEMINARY’S CARBON FOOTPRINT

Thanks to a new course and student initiative, Gettysburg Seminary received the first-ever calculation of its carbon footprint. The Seminary’s score was 1036 metric tons of CO2 per year, measured before it began to take steps to reduce the size of the carbon output.

In a fall semester class called “Ecology and Stewardship” and taught by Professor Gil Waldkoenig, students collected data to generate the carbon footprint score. Patient and good-natured seminary staff members made a huge contribution by answering questions and providing information, data, billing history and more.

With the seminary’s 2011 installation of geothermal HVAC in its chapel, students expect the carbon footprint will begin to decrease immediately. The student researchers identified other ways that the seminary can readily save energy—and therefore save money. Better energy stewardship will translate into concentrated resources for education of leaders and the mission of the church.

For years the seminary has recycled paper, bottles and cans, and encouraged students, faculty and staff to minimize waste. Assessing the carbon output of the entire institution, however, provides criteria to plan for systematic improvement in energy efficiency.

The students used the same assessment as many other colleges and universities across the country, the “campus carbon calculator” provided by www.cleanair—coolplanet.org. Schools have used this tool to achieve measurable savings for their budgets.

In the world of higher education, seminaries are small institutions compared to most universities and colleges. At present Gettysburg Seminary does not have appropriate comparative readings from other institutions, but the score calculated in the fall of 2011 will be a baseline for comparison in subsequent years.

The students identified key contributors to the carbon footprint. They discovered that one year of mowing the seminary grass was equivalent to driving from Gettysburg to Los Angeles and back—17 times! Analysis of water usage showed that the seminary will begin to save thousands of dollars by even a small investment for low-flow faucets and toilets. The students discovered a 75% reduction in electricity for lighting by using and appropriately recycling CFL bulbs. Clothes dryers and washers in the dorms, seminary vehicles, staff commuting and faculty business travel all came under examination as well.

In future years the seminary may add data about student commuting and other factors to enrich its understanding of how it uses energy and emits carbon.  The Seminary may even deserve offset credit for the many trees and green spaces it tends on its 52-acre campus. Calculation of carbon footprints will become more precise for businesses, municipalities, homes and churches in the years ahead. Thanks to some energetic and visionary students, LTSG at least has an initial report and a real sense of direction for improvement.

“The wonderful news is that Christ unites us to God’s sustaining creativity,” said Professor Waldkoenig. “To cherish and steward God’s creation at our doorsteps is to affirm that Christ never stops loving all he came to save.”

Gettysburg Seminary To Install Water-Saving Measures Across Campus

(March 7, 2012) The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg will continue its campus greening efforts by turning to water savings later this month in a focus on showers and hand sinks across its 25 buildings. If estimates hold true, the Seminary will cut its water consumption by roughly half a million gallons annually, according to calculations that resulted from carbon footprint measures done in the fall of 2011.  Tormod Svensson, a senior seminarian who has completed his Master of Divinity studies and has been called to serve as pastor of St. Johns Lutheran Church, Cumberland, MD, is a skilled plumber from his first career and will be installing water saving devices on showers and hand sinks throughout the seminary.

Seminary Expanding Composting and Community Garden Efforts

(March 8, 2012) Following a pilot project conducted in the Refectory by Biggerstaff’s Catering Company, Gettysburg Seminary will be expanding its on campus composting to include some residential areas, thanks to the Green Task Force. The task force is deploying composting with funds granted by the Stewardship of Life Institute, Gettysburg, PA. The composting project will also support soil building efforts related to the community garden.

Report from April, 2010

Submitted by    John Spangler   & Katy Giebenhain
Gettysburg Seminary report additions:

Curriculum: A number of specific courses; also content in theology courses, integrative seminars, church administration course

Worship: The seminary continues to use, quarterly, the liturgical setting “Of the Land and Seasons” composed and arranged by Stephen Folkemer (who is professor of church music at Gettysburg) with texts by Herman Stuempfle, Beth Folkemer, and others, focusing on metaphors taken from land and nature cycles.

Community: Green Task Force of faculty, students and staff. Recycling expansion, CSA support, on campus gardening, and green principles in land development in seminary campus master plan underway.

Building and Grounds: 
The seminary engaged in extensive feasibility study for geothermal conversions, with first test well (successful) drilled in 2008. Heat pumps were installed in the seminary library in 2008, employed for current cooling (anticipating later ground well hook up). The seminary also is in final stages of proposed historic walking path on campus for tourists and for the health of seminary community; Seminary linked to Gettysburg “Inner Loop” bicycle pathway plan, and providing a “stop” on a Gettysburg area mass transit system set to come on board this spring. Seminary hosts YWCA on campus and subsidizes student, faculty, and staff memberships. Students encouraged to use outdoor lines for clothes drying.  Gettysburg National Park setting is a threshold to miles and miles of healthy walking, scenic views and space for contemplation and prayer.

Advocacy: The seminary is active in land use controversy surrounding proposal of a casino for Gettysburg (successfully rebuffed in 2006, has emerged again in 2010). Hosted and participated in a community-wide observance of the DFA-sponsored 350 Climate Action event October 24th, 2009.

Last updated 4/10

Henry Huntington

henryphuntington at gmail dot com
23834 The Clearing Dr.
Eagle River, AK  99577
(907) 696-3564

Current Position/Vocation/Location
Arctic Science Director, Ocean Conservancy (2017-)
Owner, Huntington Consulting (1996-)

Relevant Publications by Speaker

Huntington, H.P., S.L. Danielson, F.K.Wiese, M. Baker, P. Boveng, J.J. Citta, A. De Robertis, D.M.S. Dickson, E. Farley, J.C. George, K. Iken, D.G. Kimmel, K. Kuletz, C. Ladd, R. Levine, L. Quakenbush, P. Stabeno, K.M. Stafford, D. Stockwell, and C. Wilson. 2020. Evidence suggests potential transformation of the Pacific Arctic Ecosystem is underway. Nature Climate Change 10:342–348. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-0695-2

Huntington, H.P., M. Carey, C. Apok, B.C. Forbes, S. Fox, L.K. Holm, A. Ivanova, J. Jaypoody, G. Noongwook, and F. Stammler. 2019. Climate change in context—putting people first in the Arctic. Regional Environmental Change 19(4):1217-1223. DOI: 10.1007/s10113-019-01478-8

Huntington, H.P., P.A. Loring, G. Gannon, S. Gearheard, S.C. Gerlach, and L.C. Hamilton. 2018. Staying in place during times of change in Arctic Alaska: the implications of attachment, alternatives, and buffering. Regional Environmental Change 18(2):489-499. DOI 10.1007/s10113-017-1221-6

Huntington, H.P., L.T. Quakenbush, and M. Nelson. 2017. Evaluating the effects of climate change on Indigenous marine mammal hunting in northern and western Alaska using traditional knowledge. Frontiers in Marine Science 4:319. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00319

Huntington, H.P., A. Begossi, S.F. Gearheard, B. Kersey, P. Loring, T. Mustonen, P.K. Paudel, R.A.M. Silvano, and R. Vave. 2017. How small communities respond to environmental change: patterns from tropical to polar ecosystems. Ecology and Society 22(3):9.

Huntington, H.P., R. Daniel, A. Hartsig, K. Harun, M. Heiman, R. Meehan, G. Noongwook, L. Pearson, M. Prior-Parks, M. Robards, and G. Stetson. 2015. Vessels, risks, and rules: planning for safe shipping in Bering Strait. Marine Policy 51:119-127.

Workshop/Lecture/Presentation titles

Traditional knowledge, science, and conservation in our seas: we’ll never know everything but we’re going to act anyway

Conserving abundance in the Arctic, or, how to avoid what has happened everywhere else

Faith & Understanding: climate change in Alaska and beyond Download (click) Sample Talk Outline

Some things I can’t explain, or, Why more social science studies are needed to understand human-environment interactions in the Arctic

Unknown knowns: recognizing how much we actually know when it comes to conservation and climate

“Can you send me a thermometer or something?” Functions and attributes of community-based monitoring

 

Current Personal/Public Activity relating to ecology

A career in Arctic research and conservation

As much time outdoors as possible!

Annual electronics recycling event at our church, Joy Lutheran

Links/Websites/Blogs highlighting work

https://oceanconservancy.org/people/henry-huntington/

https://www.arcus.org/researchers/35712/display

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/tek/henry-p-huntington.htm

Summary Quote from Speaker

“I can connect my faith to my work because it is important that we take care of creation. It is also important that we learn to understand and love one another, which means spending time outside of our comfort zones and being willing to question our ideas by looking at them from a different perspective.” Henry P. Huntington

 

First Lutheran in Decorah Signs Paris Pledge

by Sarah Webb, Iowa Interfaith Power & Light

First Lutheran in Decorah signed the Paris Pledge, joining other congregations across the nation to reduce our carbon pollution by 50% by 2030 and to be carbon neutral by 2050. They have already achieved the 50% reduction goal (read their story here) and they are determined to be carbon neutral by 2050.

In December of 2015, leaders from across the world will meet in Paris to negotiate the next international climate treaty. The Paris Pledge is an opportunity for people of faith to encourage world leaders to commit to deep cuts in their nation’s carbon emissions. We must practice what we preach! So we are encouraging all to sign the Paris Pledge and commit to reducing carbon at home and in our congregations.

We know it’s possible, because so many congregations have already reached the 2030 Paris Pledge carbon reduction goals, and some are even completely carbon neutral. Visit the coolcongregations.org website to learn how they did it.

Take the Paris Pledge, as an individual or as a congregation, and commit to reducing your carbon pollution. Together, we can make a real difference. Interfaith Power & Light will provide you with helpful resources and tools so you can reach your goals.

http://www.interfaithpowerandlight.org/2014/10/take-the-paris-pledge/

 

ELCA Lutheran Steven Beumer one of twelve “Faith Leaders for Climate” honored by White House as a “Champion for Change”

On Monday, July 20th, 2015, the White House recognized twelve people of faith as “Champions of Change” for their efforts in protecting our environment and communities from the effects of climate change.

Among them was Steven Beumer, an active member of St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church in Winter Park, Florida. He has led St. John to make changes through new energy efficient roofing and LED lighting. He also organized a regular worship service in April dedicated to Earth Day. Additionally, Beumer organized hands-on environmental projects such as labeling storm drains in the neighborhood to prevent trash from going into the lakes, and litter clean up on public streets near the church. Further, Beumer has worked with other faith communities to find their environmental footing within their own faith context.

In his statement on the “Champions of Change: People of Faith Acting on Climate” web page, Steven writes:

“When I was child growing up one of my favorite pastimes was getting a big book of connect the dot puzzles and working away on them. It was amazing to see the dots turn into dogs and fire trucks. Our faith communities have many “dots” imbedded in our traditions that address many issues. The environment is one of them. People of faith all share a great reverence and awe for what God has created.

“As we work to connect those dots in our respective faith traditions we see the illusion of our separation fade away. We become closer and bound together as we can celebrate our love of God’s creation—and rejoice in our work to protect it. People of faith share a unique perspective on the environment. We are not a social club, political group or secular advocacy organization, but our very existence is bound up in our oneness as a product of God’s creation. It is most important to take the moral initiative, to shine a light on the need to cherish and protect the sum total of the wonderful parts that make up all creation—people, plants and animals that grace every corner of our amazing planet.”

According to the White House, “These Champions have demonstrated clear leadership across the United States and around the world through their grassroots efforts to green their communities and educate others on the moral and social justice implications of climate change.”

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities. The event will be live streamed on the White House website.

Read the “Champions of Change: People of Faith Acting on Climate”

Thank you for registering to “join” us for worship Sept. 20th!

We are grateful that you plan to use the creation-focused worship service offered by Lutherans Restoring Creation based on the readings for September 20th.

Within the day we will email you a private link to the recording so you can preview it (and download it if you chose) before sharing it with your congregation.   But if you just want to embed the link to go out to your congregation or be ready for service here is the link to the YouTube Channel premiere site: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apk_R3_j9WY

The file is HUGE and we may reach download quota with over 600 of you having registered already.

Be sure to add our email address to your contacts so that it doesn’t end up in spam: info@lutheransrestoringcreation.org

Please share this free resource with your synod office and other churches as we are working hard to provide a dynamic and thoughtful service to our ELCA community – we want it to be widely utilized!

 

Finding Ways to Work Alongside Grief and Anguish

Thanks to all who joined the August 2020 Connections Call to share experiences with and resources on how to keep moving acknowledging the inevitable grief we experience as humans.  Listen in on the call (click here) and see below the various readings,  next steps, and tools that were referenced during the call.

SHARED ON THE CALL

Creation-Focused Worship Service for Sept. 20th

Thank you to all who made our first-ever Creation Focused Online Worship Service a huge success!  In addition to the thousands who watched the premiere via our social media outlets, we had over 600 churches register to share the service with over 40,000 of their members tuning in!  We pray that many will continue the journey and make a Covenant with Creation as a next step.

You can watch the service anytime on our Facebook page (under videos) and on our YouTube Channel.

Lutherans Restoring Creation Bulletin
for 9/20/2020 Service

 

Please take our survey after watching to share your feedback!

Heidi Ann Michelsen

I´m currently an administrator and professor for the study abroad program of Valparaiso University,  (Praxis Center) located in Costa Rica.  I teach classes about Central American history, politics, religion, ethnicity, environmental issues, sustainable development and also Comparative Healthcare Systems.   In addition, I occasionally lead short term service learning experiences for U.S. universities.  In light of the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on my work with college students, I´m also getting certified as a medical interpreter, which I hope to be doing online in the near future.

I served for 21 years in ministry with Lutheran congregations in Costa Rica which were located in squatter´s settlements with primarily Nicaraguan immigrants. I´ve also been involved in initiatives with the Costa Rican Lutheran Church for the past 6 years about climate change and with an ecumenical group of church leaders seeking to educate local congregations about environmental issues.  

In addition, I live in an intentional Christian community ( which seeks to be responsible stewards of the environment through a variety of local projects in our neighborhood.   I bring a perspective about how climate change is affecting vulnerable communities in Central America, and also some of the solutions and mitigation efforts that are being implemented in the region.

Check out the educational presentation Heidi has uses in sharing the connections between faith and climate justice: 

Climate Justice and the Church – Power Point Presentation

Pastor Jeff Schlesinger

Pastor, Heart of Illinois Lutheran Parish (First Lutheran, Lee, IL and Immanuel Lutheran, Compton, IL)

Creation Care has been a lifelong passion of mine and I am thrilled to stretch my network of fellow stewards of Creation beyond the walls of my own congregation and the borders of my synod. I  participate and am active in a number of secular organizations that tend to the environment and am happy to bring the perspective of a “concerned person of faith” to these tables, but relish chances to gather with others whose motivation to care for the land and critters and skies around us comes from a theological perspective. To do so with people throughout the country feeds me, helps me grow in my own understanding and actions and offer the same to others.

Eco-Reformation & Environmental Justice: In Word & Deed

The Grace Gathering ran parallel to the 2016 Churchwide Voting Assembly in New Orleans. The goal in gathering was to inspire one another to look back at the 500 years since the Reformation and see how to move forward in faith and love for the next 500 years. On August 11th a small group was planning to go out and serve near the Make it Right community in the Lower Ninth Ward, still rising from the ashes of the devastation since the levees failed. While, it proved to rainy to get to the land that needed cultivating, our host, Constance Fowler was gracious enough to show off local urban gardens and the Living History Museum. This proved to be a truly transformational outing, even though many were disappointed to not “get their hands dirty”. The service of bearing witness as an act of solidarity with those still impacted by systematic injustices is immeasurable.

The concept of Eco-Reformation was well considered throughout the event as seen in the Reformation Sourcebook Sampler given to every participant which included a section written by LRC founder, Rev. David Rhoads. Two workshops were offered and very well attended: one regarding the WHAT is and WHY we need an Eco-Reformation, and the other focused on the HOW TO engage in the ongoing eco-reformation progress.
Professor Richard Perry, Rev. Nancy Wright, Louis Tillman, Ruth Ivory-Moore and Phoebe Morad shared specific information about the history of the Creation Care movement in the ELCA, including how environmental racism parallels to civil rights injustices.  To download, click: Professor Richard Perry’s pastoral response to environmental racism. If you believe a similar conversation would be appreciated in your community consider looking at our Speaker’s Bureau to see who is in your area.
  

How Do We Truly Commit to the Earth Charter?

During the 2019 Churchwide Assembly the ELCA voted to officially sign onto the principals of the Earth CharterFor a history on that process read here (click).

Now what? How do we all make sure we live this out? 

Thanks to the focus of the Delaware-Maryland Creation Care Ministry group who is acting as shepherd for the larger ELCA Sustainability Table on this facet of our work together.

See most recent working group notes here (from May 2020) and consider how your synod (or just your congregation) may follow their lead: 

As part of the Sustainability/Environment Table workgroup to implement the Earth Charter, the Delaware-Maryland Synod Creation Care Ministry decided to focus on principles 7.a. and 7.b. under II. Ecological integrity.

7. Adopt patterns of production, consumption, and reproduction that safeguard Earth’s regenerative capacities, human rights, and community well-being.

a. Reduce, reuse, and recycle the materials used in production and consumption systems, and ensure that residual waste can be assimilated by ecological systems.

b. Act with restraint and efficiency when using energy, and rely increasingly on renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.

These were recommended because we believe these goals can be embraced and achieved by our congregations and because energy efficiency and adoption of renewable energy sources is critical to address our climate crisis.

As such, we developed an Eco-Resolution (see here) that was to be presented during this year’s Delaware-Maryland Synod Assembly in May 2020.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our assembly was cancelled, however we continue to share our message via digital means including videos we have produced.

Our Synod Council will vote on whether to pass the resolution and Larry Ryan produced a video to explain our objectives:  YouTube link

  1. Awareness of the ELCA’s longstanding support of Creation Care and specifically the 1993 ELCA Social Statement on the Environment.

2. Awareness of the Earth Charter that was endorsed during Churchwide Assembly in 2019.

3.  Implementation of portions of the Earth Charter working in cooperation with the ELCA Sustainability/Environment Table.

4. Engaging with congregations to help them be better stewards of creation as defined in our project “New Hope for Creation” that received funding from our Synod Connectedness Team.

In addition to our video on the Eco-Resolution, we asked Delaware-Maryland Synod Bishop Bill Gohl to produce a video that explains the Earth Charter at a high level : CLICK HERE

And as part of our outreach to congregations with our New Hope for Creation project, Charlie Bailey produced a video (click here) for his congregation that invites them to become better stewards of creation by becoming a covenant congregation, modeled after LRC’s Covenant for Congregation.

The Delaware-Maryland Synod Creation Care Ministry would be happy to engage with other Synods in implementing the Earth Charter and other creation care work.

Skip the Grid

Skip the Grid is an initiative focused on bringing solar power to health care systems and other critical infrastructure in West Africa. Most clinics and many hospitals around the world are off the grid, relying on generators where fuel is difficult and costly to deliver. Hospitals often must shut down their power system for periods of time to conserve fuel. Vaccines are jeopardized, and operations become riskier with intermittent or no power.

Without consistent and reliable power, rural communities face an uphill battle in managing very real health challenges. Photovoltaic (PV) micro-grids represent a sustainable, long-term solution that free up capital for direct health care initiatives, as well as mitigate numerous untold environmental, social, and health costs.

 How Skip the Grid Got Started 

The Skip the Grid initiative was inspired by a Women of the ELCA trip to Phebe Hospital in 2012. At the end of the trip, women from the NE MN Women of the ELCA asked Dr. Jefferson Sibley, a doctor at Phebe hospital, what he saw as the biggest need at the hospital. His answer – reliable energy.

When the Women of the ELCA returned home to Minnesota, they called on RREAL for help.

The Rural Renewable Energy Alliance (RREAL) is a nonprofit organization that has been fighting energy poverty with solar power since 2000. Skip the Grid is an initiative RREAL shares in collaboration with the Lutheran Women of the ELCA to bring solar power to the health care sector in West Africa. These solar projects have attracted support from hundreds of donors and international acclaim.

PV for Phebe

The first Skip the Grid project was built in rural Liberia at Phebe Hospital and School of Nursing. The Women of the ELCA and RREAL worked together to raise funds for the Phebe array, which is now producing power. The solar electric array at Phebe provides up to 77% of the hospital’s daytime electricity needs, reducing operations and maintenance costs. Commissioned in 2017, the project resulted in reduced fossil fuel energy consumption and realized energy efficiency upgrades using renewables and powered equipment with the solar electricity power surge. Cost savings from the array are $35,000 US annually with carbon emission reductions of 198,196.28 pounds and x-ray machines can be used. The added benefits of solar allow Phebe to expand the vital health care it provides and reduce pollution.

Skip the Grid provided solar technical training to the electrical and generator staff at Phebe hospital as well as local Liberians who helped RREAL install the Phebe system. Six months after the installation, in October 2017, two of the hospital technical staff members ventured to RREAL’s home in Backus, Minnesota to participate in a two-week Solar Energy International (SEI) technical training course. The Women of the ELCA hosted the visiting Africans by offering their homes as lodging and providing meals for the trainees and trainers. The trained Phebe technicians are now sharing their knowledge to build solar on rural Liberian clinics, maintain PV micro-grid systems, and support the construction of future Skip the Grid projects.

 

In November 2017, RREAL and the Women of the ELCA traveled back to Liberia to participate in a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Phebe Hospital array. Many people were there, including Nobel Prize laureate Leymah Gbowee, the Liberian Minister of Health, many bishops, two RREAL staff, and nine members of the Women of the ELCA.

During the ribbon cutting visit, RREAL traveled to Curran Hospital to complete a site assessment and develop relationships with the staff. Current for Curran is the next project that will empower a rural Liberian hospital to expand its vital health care services to the poorest people’s through Skip the Grid.

Current for Curran

The next Skip the Grid solar project will be at Curran Hospital in Liberia, a 125-bed hospital facing significant economic and health care challenges. Curran Hospital is a regional referral hospital for 17 clinics and health centers in Lofa County, Liberia. Curran currently depends solely on expensive, polluting, and unreliable diesel generators. These generators often fail, and doctors are forced to deliver babies or complete surgeries using only a cell phone light or flashlight. Watch the Curran Hospital video here.

Without a reliable source of electricity, Curran struggles to meet the daily health care needs of its patients. We can do better. Project Current for Curran will bring clean, reliable solar energy with battery storage to the essential rural hospital in Zorzor City, Liberia.

These are our three specific and measurable objectives for Current for Curran:

1.     Raise $750,000 by October 31, 2018 to cover all project costs

2.     Ship array components, balance of system, and build materials to Liberia by November 30, 2018

3.     Build a 150-kW solar micro-grid with battery power system at Curran Hospital by March 31, 2019

We are grateful for Skip the Grid project partners who invest in the health of our world’s most vulnerable people as care for creation. Liberia, the fourth poorest country in the world, is recovering from a long civil war and the Ebola crisis. Please support Skip the Grid. Follow StG on FaceBook. RREAL and the Women of the ELCA seek your partnership and support of this innovative solar micro-grid solution for Curran Hospital and the global citizens it serves.

Submitted: March 25, 2018 by Vicki O’Day Development Director at RREAL vicki@rreal.org

RREAL is located in Backus, MN. We partner with the Women of the ELCA of Minnesota.

Katrina Martich’s Blog

Katrina Martich is the volunteer Lectionary Commentary manager and active in our cohort of leaders.  Follow her blog (click here).

“The site and my blog are part of my work to inform, equip, and inspire people to live in ways that honor the diversity of life on planet Earth. This work results from a lifetime of seeing how we are all connected by natural systems. ”

Thanks to Bishop Eaton for her Earth Day Message!

As a grassroots movement, Lutherans Restoring Creation aims to support and advocate Creation Care work throughout ELCA communities.   At our June 20, 2020 Board of Directors meeting we officially recognized the significance of Presiding Bishop Eaton’s 2020 Earth Day message (read in full here).

“…thanks Bishop Eaton for her Earth Day message and her lifting up of Lutherans Restoring Creation.”
excerpt from Minutes of June 20, 2020 LRC’s Board of Directors’ Meeting

We are eager to grow together with church-wide offices in this critical ministry as Creation Care Ambassadors and Coaches flourish, more Congregations sign Covenants with Creation and the emerging ELCA Sustainability Table guides collaborative and action-based progress.

Tools for Talking and Listening

Being church together doesn’t have to mean we have one mind.  Listening to the Holy Spirit within each of our stories can help us move beyond disagreement and confusion.   There is no one way to help us along this journey, but there are many resources to help us find common ground.  Below are some suggestions – please let us know if you have experience with these or other tools you want to share.

Methods:

Talanoa Dialogue – Read the history (click here) of this telling/listening process based on three foundational questions:
>Where are we now?
>Where do we want to go?
>How do we get there?
View sample workshop on how to share this method (click here). 

World Cafe Method – There is a whole community of facilitators with online advice (click here) who can help you figure out how to use this manner of group decision making.  This is a great format when you have people together who already care about an issue but don’t know what steps to take next or feel like they aren’t hearing from all perspectives.   Download an easy visual guide here.

Deliberative Dialogue – For a clear definition of this process of group engagement explore the National Issues Forum site (click here).  For a whole toolkit using this process re: Climate Choices (click here). 

Resources:

Confused about our way forward?

As there has been continuing conversation and controversy emerging since Michael Moore’s film: Planet of the Human, we decided to share some feedback from a Lutherans Restoring Creation member.  Thanks to Josh Thede, an active member of the Central States LRC Mission Table.

Our LRC community plans to discuss the broader challenge of how to make progress in this ministry when consensus on solutions seems vague,  if not conflicting.  Join our next Connection Call. 

Katherine Hayhoe has some of the most compelling information:
Post 1 
Post 2 

Bill Mckibben’s response is interesting,  featured in Rolling Stone (click here).  Above photo from Rolling Stone’s piece.

Both Project Drawdown and Pachamama Alliance have good resources to move forward.
This TED talk is a great overview of that concept (click here). 

There may be a worthwhile conversation about infinite growth and GDP as a takeaway from the film. There is some interesting progress around “Donut Economics” (click here for TED talk). 

More reflections in response to the film and considerations when moving towards a host of energy solutions: