Tag Archives: Building/Grounds

So We Can Restore Creation

While caring for the environment can feel overwhelming, it’s when we stand together, each doing our part, that we find hope, gain strength, and make a difference. Find a tool below to help celebrate God’s gifts to us!

Download (Click Here) the information shared from Portico and Lutherans Restoring Creation at Churchwide Assembly 2019 to celebrate our progress and map the long way we still need to go to restore creation.

Join Up

Adults, start by taking the LRC Personal Covenant.  In 5 – 10 minutes, complete your covenant with creation. You’ll start to receive LRC’s monthly Good Green e-News linking you to other Lutheran earth-keepers and helpful resources.

ELCA Retirement Plan members, invest consciously using Portico’s ELCA social purpose funds. Call a Portico Financial Planner at 800.922.4896 to learn whether you’re in the social purpose funds and how to make that choice.

Children, take the Child’s Pledge With Creation.  Print out this out and discuss with your family. Tip: Frame your completed pledge using a larger piece of cardboard like a cereal box and decorate it with magazine photos that are important to you.

Teens, take the Youth Pledge. Then, walk through the Your Day experience, reflecting on how your daily decisions can impact others with whom we share this planet.

Inspire Others

Rally your congregation to take the Congregational Covenant with CreationThen, use LRC resources to create an action plan with support from LRC mentors.

Active Earth-keepers, become a Green Shepherd in your synodAs your synod’s point person for LRC and ELCA Advocacy and Stewardship outreach, learn to identify, connect and motivate other “green sheep” in your synod.

 

EPA’s Energy Star Congregation’s Guide

The United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ENERGY STAR® program and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborated through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Commercial Buildings Research Group to create this workbook.
This workbook serves as a resource and planning guide for clergy, staff, and laypersons of houses of worship who want to increase the energy efficiency of their facilities by implementing realistic and cost effective energy improvement projects. Download the guide and appendices for free below.  Be sure to also find out who near you  (see map) has become a part of the EPA’s Protfolio Manager program +/or has tried some of these suggestions in their house of worship.

EPA’s Energy Guide for Congregations

Appendices to support EPA Guide

Disclaimer

All energy, water, and monetary savings listed in this document are based upon average savings for end users and are provided for educational purposes only. Actual savings will vary based on energy, water, and facility use, national weather data for your locality, energy prices, and other factors. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are calculated based on emission factors reported to the U.S. EPA by the electric utility provider serving your ZIP Code. Data referenced in this document is provided by the U.S. EPA and the U.S. DOE’s NREL

Water discipleship tools – fresh from Vermont!

Vermont Lutheran Church partners with Interfaith Power & Light to Share the Various Ways to Revere Water:

In 2018, Vermont Interfaith Power and Light (VTIPL) joined with local organizations to create a model for watershed stewardship, based on the experience of Ascension Lutheran Church in South Burlington, Vermont.  The Reverend Dr. Nancy Wright, pastor of Ascension Lutheran Church, and Richard Butz, a member of the church, are co-authors of the manuals. Rev. Nancy Wright is also a chairperson of the New England Synod’s Lutherans Restoring Creation “Green Team”. 

VTIPL has created two manuals, one with a Christian emphasis, Congregational Watershed Discipleship Manual: Faith Communities as Stewards of the World’s Waters (1st Christian edition) and another with an interreligious emphasis, Congregational Watershed Manual: Religious Communities as Stewards of the World’s Waters (1st Interreligious edition).

Each one of these inspiring and practical manuals is available by free download from the pdfs on VTIPL’s website (www.vtipl.org) and this website.  Alternatively, if you’d like one copy or multiple copies of the printed and bound manual(s), you can fill out and mail in the order form (attached below).  These are high resolution print copies, spiral bound to conveniently lie flat.  If you’d like to order one or more copies online, you can do this through the website of the organization Voices of Water for Climate (VOW).  VOW is working with VTIPL to take orders and distribute printed copies of the manuals.  Donations to VOW for printed copies will cover costs incurred, including shipping and handling.  The link to order online is below.

www.vow4climate.org/store 

(Email info@lutheransrestoringcreation.org if you are interested in going in on a bulk order with others!)

This is Church and You Are Needed Inside & Out

Watch this message from our churchwide leaders and fellow members across the country who recognize the tough, uncomfortable work of being “called out” into the world.  It is an empowering 7 minutes – worth the watch for all of us, not just the voting members who will be sitting in the conference rooms.

For those wanting to embolden their sense of calling to Creation Care for All as ministry inside and outside the church – you don’t need to have a resolution ready,  join a march, or preach on climate (yet). Start here:

 

Growing a garden church from food scraps and compost

We turned an empty lot in L.A. into an edible sanctuary.

by Anna Woofenden (shared from Christian Century magazine)

When I moved to Los Angeles in 2014 to start a church that connected people with food, the earth, each other, and God, I envisioned a sanctuary created around the table. It would not be built out of stones and stained glass and wood but would be circled by vegetable beds and fruit trees, with sky for ceiling and earth for floor. The vision was to create an urban farm and outdoor sanctuary feeding people in body, mind, and spirit.

In the early months, the Garden Church wandered from public park to downtown street corner. We walked the neighborhood and listened to our neighbors, finding out which grocery stores had fresh vegetables and noticing the homeless encampments, the schools, the clinics, and the empty lots. [Read more here…]

 

 

 

Congregation celebrates “green graduation,” invites wider community (2017)

Members of LCI gather on the steps of the California Capitol to join California Interfaith Power and Light’s Lobby Day. They advocated for passage of SB 350, which aims to increase California’s renewable energy mix to 50 percent and doubles the energy efficiency of existing buildings. 

Church invites all to its ‘green graduation’ celebration
It’s a little early for graduation season, but Lutheran Church of the Incarnation is celebrating its own commencement of sorts.
Last year, LCI successfully completed the GreenFaith Certification Program, earning official recognition for its work to care for God’s creation. LCI is only the second Lutheran congregation nationally to earn this recognition, and one of only two faith communities in California.

The GreenFaith organization maintains the program that urges faith communities to step up their efforts to integrate sustainability into their ministries and operations. They provide support, resources and a clear road map to achieve the distinction as a sustainable sanctuary. GreenFaith’s independent verification of accomplishments ensures that the certification is meaningful.
LCI believes that environmental stewardship is a moral responsibility. But the church doesn’t just preach about it, it is a common thread throughout all of its ministries and activities.
LCI’s final report to GreenFaith chronicled 139 distinct activities over the two years of the program, in the categories of spirit, environmental justice, action, education and communications.
Church members see themselves as the hands who do God’s work, so they are working to reduce their environmental footprint.

For example, the use of sustainable materials, water-conserving landscapes and energy-efficient lighting, heating, cooling and appliances helped them to expand the LCI facility at 1701 Russell Blvd. in West Davis, while cutting the energy that would have been used after the expansion by 15 percent and minimizing use of resources.

After the renovation, LCI was honored to receive an award for Energy Efficiency from California Interfaith Power and Light recognizing its achievements.

LCI’s worship service also reflect this theme with liturgical art, music and prayer that inspire caring for creation, as well as frequent sermons that call parishioners to approach God’s gifts with a sense of reverence and stewardship.

The child, youth and adult education programs include experiential learning about sustainability. For example, the children planted an organic vegetable garden, and served the harvested food at a lecture on “Food and Faith.”

 

 

Florida/Bahamas Synod Energy Audit Resolution (2009)

Florida/Bahamas Synod, 2009

Congregations to do Annual Energy Audits

Targeted to 25% by 2020

WHEREAS, we face urgent climate perils that remind us of the story of Noah and the Ark as God’s earth nears a climate tipping point;

·     Warming of the atmosphere, rising sea levels, changing rainfall and weather patterns will leave millions more people hungry, displace millions from their homes, and lead to increased disease, heat-related illnesses at death.

·     These are the unraveling results of over-dependence on fossil fuels.  Fossil fuel dependence is at the core of the most pressing issues confronting people and governments all over the world – global security, human rights, mass extinctions of species, health, and economy.

·     We all face a critical moment in history, challenged to choose between two distinct futures.  If we continue on our current path, we face catastrophic consequences for generations to come.  When we choose to embrace a new energy and climate vision, we face a future built on justice, earth stewardship, sufficiency and sustainability.  Together, we can address our call to provide for the vulnerable among us and protect the diversity in God’s gift of Creation.

WHEREAS, God challenges us through the prophet Micah to do justice, love mercy and walk humbly, how then shall we act as a people?

·         In the economic, energy, and climate change crises that face our nation and global community, there is both danger and opportunity.

·         Too much of the conversation on the economic crisis has ignored the causes of poverty and the growing ranks of the poor.

·         When we choose a new path, we can create a sustainable and more just future for our nation and all of God’s people.

·         All of us – business and government, private and public, faith-based and nonprofit, the well-organized and the often-forgotten – need to be involved if we are to attain clean, sustainable, and just energy for all people.

·         By working with existing and emerging networks we can develop practical steps for guiding our congregations and our members in increasing energy efficiency and using more clean energy.

WHEREAS, by discussing sacred texts, actively listening to scientific information, and centering in prayer we can open ourselves to new ways in which our footprint on   the earth reflects our true spiritual values and leads to greater forms of sustainable society while lowering waste and abusive consumption of non-renewable resources; and

WHEREAS, how we witness and give voice to a just and sustainable world is public testimony to the depth of our faith in God who made the creation very good; therefore, be it

RESOLVED, that we as a people accept the call to  seize this opportunity to declare a vision of transformed economy that is more inclusive and sustainable – a vision that involves challenges both to our own communities of faith and to society in general; and be it further

RESOLVED,  that we call on the bishop and other church leaders of the Florida-Bahamas Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America to urge our congregations to engage in sacred conversations for discerning the kind of world God calls us to pass on to our children, grandchildren, and all of God’s creatures; and be it further

RESOLVED, that as people of faith we urge congregations of the Florida-Bahamas Synod to address our own use of energy by conducting energy (carbon footprint) audits in our houses of worship and our houses of business and our homes for living; and be it finally

RESOLVED, that these audits be a first step in a series of actions to reduce our carbon emissions 25% by 2020.

Checklist for Energy Savings Room by Room

Overall Home Energy Saving Measures

Efficiency

  • Heat/ AC: Install high efficiency ENERGY STAR-rated furnace and air conditioner, at least at level of 94% efficiency. Place furnace where it can provide the greatest distribution of forced air flow throughout the house.
  • Heat/AC: Have duct settings adjusted for maximum spread/flow of heat and cool air throughout the house.
  • Heat/AC: Install ceiling fans to bring heat to floor levels in winter and to circulate cool air in summer.
  • Heat/AC: Seal heat ducts to prevent leaking hot air into basement.
  • Heat/AC: Shut off rooms not in use. Use magnetic mats to cover heat vents in closed off room.
  • Windows: install high efficiency energy star double-or triple-paned windows and storm windows. Close/lock tightly and seal in winter. Seal window sash at top and bottom with self-adhesive foam.
  • Windows: Use honeycomb shades with double or triple cell construction. Put up drapes with thermal liners, measured to cover window frame.
  • Windows: Use window insulation kits (clear, easily removable caulk or plastic covers) for extra protection from cold.
  • Windows: On south side, open curtains and lower shades for sun to heat in winter. Shift from east to west from morning to night. Open windows for outside air to cool in summer.
  • Insulation: Request of energy company or hire energy expert to do complete evaluation (incentives from government and energy company on the changes you make will pay for the expert advice). EE will do blower test to identify leaks, use “X-ray” to find places in walls that are not insulated, and find nooks and crannies throughout the house where air is escaping or entering.
  • Insulation: The biggest benefit comes from installing heavy insulation in attic, including under attic floors.
  • Insulation: Insulate electrical outlets on outside walls. Install small pads that go inside outlet covers.
  • Insulation: Insulate and weather strip outside doors, including a door to the garage. Paint and seal wood doors to the outside, or put on insulation.
  • Insulation: Put door sweeps (or snakes) at bottom of outside doors or doors to rooms that have been shut off from heat. Make sure doors close tightly.
  • Lights: install CFLs or LEDs in every outlet and lamp. Where needed retrofit for the most efficient fluorescent tubes.
  • Lights: Install motion sensors for rooms where lights are used often and prone to be left on.
  • Water: Put aerators on all sink faucets throughout the house. Install low-flow shower heads.
  • Water: Check regularly for leaks in all faucets (inside and out), toilets, and pipes throughout the house. Repair leaks immediately.

Conservation:

  • Heat/ AC: Have furnace/ air conditioner tuned and serviced once a year.
  • Furnace: Change furnace filters each month or every three months, depending on the longevity of the filter.
  • Heat/AC: make sure forced-air vents are unobstructed. Make sure air return vents are unobstructed.
  • Heat/AC: Have air ducts cleaned every ten years.
  • Heat: Seal heat ducts to prevent leaking hot air.
  • Heat/AC: Clear and clean cold air returns and registers.
  • Thermostat: Set 24/7 thermostat. Lower heat at night and when absent. Wear warm clothes rather than high heat.  Turn heat down in winter for the night. Set automatic thermostat in house for 60 to begin one-half hour before bed and to end one-half hour before rising.
  • Heat: Turn down heat when away from the house.
  • Lights: Turn off lights in rooms not in use. Use minimal light when in use.
  • Lights: Position lamps/ furniture for optimum lighting.
  • Lights: Open thermal curtains and shades for sun to provide natural heat in winter. Use outside air to cool in summer. Block windows from sun to preserve inside cool in summer.
  • Windows: On south side, open curtains and lower shades for sun to heat in winter. Shift from east to west from morning to night. Open windows for outside air to cool in summer.
  • Lights: Depend on outside natural light. Turn off lights/ overhead fan when not in use. Turn off oven fan and light when not in use.
  • Heat: Turn down heat when away from the house.
  • Insulation: Fill openings into the basement from water spigots, gas lines, electric service outlets, cable TV, and data lines.
  • Heat: Seal heat ducts to prevent leaking hot air.
  • Heat/AC: Clear and clean cold air returns and registers.
  •  Lights: When away from house for days, put lamp on timer to come on at night.

KITCHEN

Efficiency

  • Appliances: (Energy Star): Replace appliances after ten years or sooner. Purchase top to bottom refrigerator. Side by side refrigerator-freezer uses 7-13% more energy than when freezer is at top or bottom.  Do not position refrigerator near heat. Leave two inches on either side of refrigerator.
  • Refrigerator/ Freezer: Set at medium for refrigerator (37-40 degrees F) and freezer (0 to 5 degrees F). A freezer that is filled with food is more efficient.
  • Dish washing: Get ENERGY STAR high efficiency. Use dishwasher rather than hand washing. Run on energy saving/shorter cycle. Turn off “heat drying.” Clean filter; open door to air dry.
  • Compost food: Avoid use of disposal. If you use disposal, run cold water. Compost food scraps.
  • Water: Install aerator on faucets. Fix leaks immediately.
  • Water: Use effective sink stoppers.
  • Cooking: Use microwave or toaster oven for less energy. Use pressure cookers and crock pots.
  • Stove: use lids to heat. Clean burner bowls to retain heat. Use burners smaller than the pan. Have oven on only when pre-heating or in use. Make sure gaskets on oven door seal properly. Don’t open oven when cooking.
  • Small appliances: Avoid unnecessary electric appliances such as electric peelers, can openers, or carving knives. Unplug unused refrigerators and freezers.
  • Clock. Avoid electric clock. Use clock with recycled batteries. Use solar clock.
  • Pantry: Turn off light in pantry or put on motion sensor.

Conservation:

  • Refrigerator: Make sure the rubber gaskets on the doors seal fully (clean or replace).
  • Refrigerator: Clean coils, under refrigerator, behind front panel, evaporator pan, and motor every six months. Use “feet” to make refrigerator level front to back and side to side.
  • Refrigerator: Do not leave refrigerator or freezer door open when doing tasks.
  • Water: Do not let the water run unnecessarily. Use cold water for most tasks. Post reminders.
  • Cooking: Use microwave rather than oven. Use smaller appliances. Save energy with slow cookers (crock pot).
  • Cooking: Lower the heat after boiling. Use lids. Do not check food in oven. Seal oven door.
  • Lights: Depend on outside natural light. Turn off lights/ overhead fan when not in use. Turn off oven fan and light when not in use.
  • Dish washing: Scrape but do not rinse dishes before putting them in the dish washer. If you scrape, use cold water. Do dishwasher only when it is full. Run on energy saving cycle. Turn off heated drying.
  • Cooking: Use microwave or toaster oven for less energy. Use pressure cookers and crock pots.
  • Stove: use lids to heat. Clean burner bowls to retain heat. Use burners smaller than the pan. Have oven on only when pre-heating or in use. Make sure gaskets on oven door seal properly. Don’t peak in oven.
  • Compost: Avoid disposals by composting all food. If you use the disposal, use cold water.
  • Appliances: Unplug unused refrigerators and freezers.
  • Electricity: Turn off at the source toasters, coffee pots, and microwaves when not in use.
  • Avoid paper: Re-use cloth napkins by designating a napkin for each person with napkin holder. Use cloth towels rather than paper towels.
  • Re-use: Re-use personal drinking glasses during the day.
  • Re-use: Avoid disposable paper or plastic plates, cups, utensils, containers.
  • Electricity: Use smart plug to turn off microwave when not in use (phantom electricity)
  • Electricity: Use smart strip to turn off radios and TVs when not in use.

Efficiency

  • Heat/air: make sure forced-air vents are unobstructed.
  • Heat/air: install high efficiency windows and storm windows. Close tightly and seal in winter. Install insulating shades. Put up thermal curtains.
  • Heat/air: Install ceiling fan for heat in winter and cooling in summer.
  • Lights: Use CFLs or LEDs in overhead, lamps, closet. Install motion sensors for overhead lights and closet.
  • Lights: When away from house for days, put lamp on timer to come on at night only.
  • Electricity: Use smart strip to turn off TV and DVD automatically at the source when not in use (phantom electricity).

Conservation

  • Lights: Open thermal curtains and shades for sun to heat in winter. Use outside air to cool in summer.
  • Lights: Place furniture to optimize natural lighting. Position lamps for maximum effect.
  • Lights: turn off when not in use. Use only the lights/lamps needed. Use small LED night lights.
  • Heat: Turn heat down in winter for the night. Set automatic thermostat in house for 60 to begin one-half hour before bed and to end one-half hour before rising, health permitting. Add clothing and bedding for warmth.
  • Heat: Turn down heat when away from the house.
  • Electricity: Turn off TV and radio when not in use. Use smart strip.
  • Clock: Use renewable battery-driven wall or table clock.

BEDROOM

Efficiency

  • Heat/air: make sure forced-air vents are unobstructed. Check need for insulation in walls and ceiling.
  • Heat/air: install high efficiency windows and storm windows. Close tightly and seal in winter. Install insulating shades. Put up thermal curtains.
  • Lights: Install motion sensors overhead lights. Use CFLs or LEDs in overhead and lamps.
  • Lights: Use natural light during the day. Use small LED night light for nighttime.
  • Electricity: Turn off TV and radio when not in use. Use smart strip to turn off TV, DVD, and radio automatically at the source when not in use (phantom electricity).

Conservation

  • Lights: Open thermal curtains and shades for sun to heat in winter. Use outside air to cool in summer.
  • Lights: turn off when not in use. Use only the lights/lamp needed. Use LED night lights.
  • Heat: Turn heat down in winter for the night. Set automatic thermostat in house for 60 to begin one-half hour before bed and to end one-half hour before rising. Use clothing and extra bedding for warmth.
  • Energy: Turn off TVs and radios when not in use.
  • Energy: Use alarm clock powered by renewable battery.

BATHROOM

Efficiency:

  • Heat/air: Make sure heat vents are unobstructed.
  • Heat/air: Attend to windows (see above)
  • Lights: Use CFLs or LEDs. Install motion sensors on lights. If you have multiple lights over sink, use only what is needed.
  • Lights: Use natural light during the day. Use small LED night light for nighttime.
  • Water: Use aerators on sink faucets. Use low-flow shower heads. Repair leaks immediately.
  • Water: Use low water toilets. Or deposit tank balloon or brick to displace water. Flush less often. Repair running toilets immediately. Advanced: self-composting toilet.
  • Paper: Use post-consumer waste toilet paper.

Conservation:

  • Water: Do not run water while brushing teeth, shaving, scrubbing hands, combing hair, etc. Post reminders. Use cold water for washing hands, shaving, etc.
  • Water: Take a shower rather than a bath. Take fewer showers. Get a “shower coach” (small plastic hour-glass to be put in shower area with suction cup) and limit your showers to five minutes.
  • Water: flush less often.
  • Water: Fill bucket with cold water when getting a hot shower and use it for watering plants.
  • Lights: Turn off lights when not in use, even motion sensor lights. Post reminders.
  • Electricity: Turn off curling irons, electric tooth brushes, and other electric devices when not in use.
  • Laundry: Designate personal towels and wash cloths for re-use to limit need for unnecessary laundry. Avoid plush towels so as to provide more space in washing machine.

LAUNDRY ROOM

Efficiency

  • Appliances: Purchase high efficiency energy star washers and dryers. Front load washers use half the energy and water as top loading washers.
  • Lights: Use CFLs or LEDs. Turn off when not in use—between loads. Install motion sensors lights.
  • Heat/air: make sure air vents are unobstructed.
  • Heat/air: install high efficiency windows and storm windows. Close tightly and seal in winter. Put up thermal curtains. Open for sun to heat in winter. Use outside air to cool in summer.

Conservation

  • Washer and Dryer: Run washer and dryer only on full loads.
  • Washer and Dryer: Adjust water level and cycle length to maximize savings. Wash clothes in warm or cold. Rinse in cold.
  • Washer and Dryer Pre-soak only the dirtiest clothes.
  • Washer and Dryer Dry clothes on lines in basement or outside.
  • Washer and Dryer Do not over-dry clothes. Clean the dryer lint filter after each load.
  • Washer and Dryer Clean dryer exhaust duct and outside vents.
  • Washer and Dryer Grab and fold/hang from dryer to avoid the need for ironing.
  • Washer and Dryer Run appliances at night.

ATTIC

  • Lights: Use CFLs or LEDs. Turn off when not in use. Install motion sensor lights.
  • Insulation: Put extensive insulation between floor joists and under floor. Seal floor spaces. R-50 at least.
  • Insulation: Locate hidden spaces around attic edges and insulate well. Insulate stairway to attic.
  • Insulation: If heating ducts or return air ducts go through attic, cover them with insulation.
  • Insulation: Put insulation on inside of attic door and put seals around the door.
  • Air flow: Provide adequate airflow to avoid heat settling on floor of attic in summer.
  • Air flow: Install solar fan on roof for air movement in attic.

BASEMENT

  • Lights: Use CFLs or LEDs. Install motion sensors for some rooms. Turn off when not in use.
  • Heat/AC: Get high efficiency Energy Star furnace/ air conditioner. Have furnace serviced each year. Change filters regularly.
  • Heat: Seal heat ducts to prevent leaking hot air into basement area.
  • Insulation: Weather strip, insulate, and cover small basement windows often overlooked. Install glass block windows.
  • Insulation: Insulate portion of outside walls above the foundation.
  • Insulation: Insulate on ceiling above crawl spaces.
  • Insulation: Insulate basement ceiling if cold, especially along cracks and separations.
  • Insulation Insulate along the rim joists where the foundation meets the walls. R-19.
  • Insulation Insulate hot water pipes.
  • Insulation Fill openings into the basement around water spigots, gas lines, electric service outlets, cable TV, and internet lines.
  • Insulation Seal basement for winter and use air vents in glass-block windows for summer to avoid high humidity.
  • Water: Put aerators on sink faucets. Repair leaks immediately.
  • Water: Use low water toilets. If not a low water-use toilet, deposit tank balloon or brick to displace water. Repair running toilets immediately. Advanced: self-composting toilet.
  • Water heater: Set temperature at 120. Drain overflow occasionally. Put a blanket on water heater (3 inches).
  • Water heater: Advanced: Install on-demand water heater. Or install solar panel panels for energy to heat water.
  • Humidity appliances: Dehumidifier/ humidifier: If use dehumidifier is used in summer, set level and timer to save money. Purchase ENERGY STAR appliance. Same for humidifiers in winter.
  • Appliances: Avoid second refrigerator or freezer in basement.

OUTSIDE

Efficiency

  • Lights: Use CFLs or LEDs for porch lighting and area flood lights.
  • Lights: Put outside safety lights on motion sensor.
  • Lights: If needed regularly, put porch or area lights on timer.
  • Lights: Use solar garden lights.
  • Lights: Put in motion sensor garage lights.
  • Trees: Plant trees, shrubs, vines on trellises to provide protection from wind in winter and sun in summer. Evergreen trees on north and northwest sides of house.
  • Awnings: Put up awnings to cool the house in summer.
  • Insulation: Caulk around the outside dryer and furnace vents.
  • Mowing: Use hand mower or battery or electric mower. Or rotary mower. Keep clean (from grass caking) and serviced.
  • Leaves: Hand rake or sweep rather than leaf/ grass blower. Avoid electric trimmer and grass liner.
  • Snow: Shovel snow, when feasible, rather than snow blower.
  • Shade: Provide shade for air conditioning unit but with plenty of clear space around unit.

Conservation

  • Lights: Use only the lighting needed for use or safety.
  • Lights: Change setting of timed lighting by the season.
  • Lights: Clean outdoor light fixtures.
  • Lights: Put night window lamps on timers.
  • Garage: Limit use of automatic garage opener.

TRANSPORTATION

  • Car/ truck: Purchase electric or hybrid car or one with high fuel efficiency.
  • Alternate transportation: Walk. Ride a bicycle. Take a bus. Car pool. Avoid heavy traffic.
  • Car tip: Keep engine tuned, change regularly oil, replace air filter, have car serviced on schedule.
  • Car tip: Keep tires inflated at recommended levels.
  • Car tip: Avoid jack rabbit starts. Accelerate slowly.
  • Car tip: On highway, approximate 55 miles per hour where safe to do so.
  • Car tip: Avoid engine idling. Coast in gear. Anticipate so you do not need to come to full stop at traffic lights.
  • Car tip: Open windows to limit use of air conditioning. At 60 mph, use air conditioning, because open windows create drag.
  • Car tip: Avoid unnecessary heavy items in the trunk or car.
  • Car tip: Switch to eco-focused tires, which reduce rolling resistance.

 

 

Creation Care Congregation: Building and Grounds Ideas

Building and Grounds: “The church as an alternative community”

Energy Stewards Initiative. LRC program for congregations to reduce your energy use/costs and carbon footprint, with online tracking of energy data via the EPA’s Energy Star Portfolio, an action plan, and consultation and accountability through regular webinars. Or get an energy audit and follow steps to reduce energy. For more info contact your local utility or visit: https://www.energystar.gov/buildings/owners_and_managers/congregations

Comprehensive Environmental Guide for Churches, Their Buildings and Grounds. Use a checklist along with the full guide for an overall environmental inventory of your congregation, and take action. Download the entire guide – some details may be outdated, but the ties to faith and ideas are timeless. www.webofcreation.org/Environmental%20Guide.pdf

Choose a specific project: Replace all incandescent bulbs; retrofit fluorescent lighting; develop a recycling program; reduce paper use; purchase green cleaning products; make Earth-friendly food choices; eliminate Styrofoam; develop Earth-friendly lawn care, among others.

Use of land & water: Community garden; restore to prairie; preserve natural habitats; plant trees; create a sanctuary or peace garden; nurture animal life. Phase out fertilizers and pesticides use for lawns. Many free resources, stories, samples and readings to share throughout the LRC site, but local experts are best to build on existing relationships. Consider sharing a broader understanding of our relationship with soil by researching the “Kiss the Ground” program. This educational movement has the potential to involve those interested in agriculture, science, history, gardening and climate change.  Watershed discipleship resources are plentiful and offer a safe entry point for many who may not feel called to other issues in creation care.

Know your property as an “Earth community.” Get to know the trees, plants, animals, insects, birds, and other creatures who live with you on this space. Live in such a way that all of you may thrive together. Pray for them. Worship with them. Include some in your church directory as your creation family. For directions, go to: http://www.lutheransrestoringcreation.org/stewarding-your-property-as-an-earth-community.

For more information about Becoming a Caring-for-Creation Congregation, visit this page.

St. Andrew’s Environmental Stewardship Team: Nine Years Old and Still Going Strong!

The Environmental Stewardship Team (EST) at St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church in Mahtomedi, MN (a congregation of some 6,000 people on a campus of three sizable buildings) was founded nine years ago.

Jim Malkowski, a retired naturalist who started a large nature/environmental center and served 21 years as CEO of two centers, is co-founder of the group and was its chairman until recently.  He reports on the work of EST:

“A few of our achievements over the years have been co-sponsoring a wind generator on a co-campus with a high school, converting our 3 buildings to all LED lighting, an annual week-end devoted to a church-wide environmental messaging (called “Caring for Creation Weekend” – “C4C Weekend”)  including exhibits, music, literature and a sermon.  

“We have met monthly for nine years, formulated on-going 3-Year Planning Projections integrated into the church’s 10-Year Plans, and recently applied a $10,000 grant into a comprehensive recycling/composting program.  We are now in our second year working toward solar energy for St. Andrews, conducting walk-through planning estimates from contractors.  So, it’s been an active nine years.

“While we have the basic support of pastors’ leadership, we have yet to achieve comprehensive support to declare our church as a “Green Congregation,” a goal we continue to calculatingly pursue, vis-a-vis the Lutherans Restoring Creation Manuals. As the church’s EST, we are on the verge of much more fully integrating our work into the full mainstream of this Church’s worship and outreach.  Truly, it is a “Lutherans Restoring Creation” movement.”

See the webpage for the St. Andrews Environmental Stewardship Team, and download the EST brochure here.

 

Edmonds Lutheran Church is Going Solar

Edmonds, WA – Edmonds Lutheran Church (ELC) installed a solar photovoltaic system to generate renewable energy for their facility in mid- February 2016.  

The system was in part donated by A&R Solar, who has been working with the church for more than a year to make this vision a reality.

“Donating a system is our way of saying ‘thanks’ and giving back to a community that supported us, while also raising awareness to the fact that solar works in western Washington,” says Dave Kozin of A&R Solar. 

Edmonds Lutheran was selected by the Solarize South County Community Coalition, a volunteer group of individuals who led the award selection process. The competitive application process took into account the suitability of the facility to generate solar electricity on site and to serve as a public educational tool.

Rev. Dr. Julie Josund, pastor at Edmonds Lutheran Church has had a vision of making ELC a more eco-friendly building for many years. “We believe the caring for God’s creation goes hand-in-hand with Christian faith. Having solar panels on our church actively visible is a perfect way to get the word out about renewable energy options to many people. We are thrilled to have this partnership with A&R Solar and look forward to a fruitful collaboration in sharing the benefits of solar energy to our friends and neighbors in Edmonds.”

Pastor Tim Oleson and Rev. Dr. Julie Josund,
pastors at Edmonds Lutheran Church

“Doing social good is baked into our DNA at A&R. We believe that solar energy can make the world abetter place in a very fundamental way. The problem is that current incentives make it hard for the people that would benefit from solar energy the most–those in need and the non-profits that support them–to adopt the technology. We’re committed to helping those organizations and those people gain access to solar energy by donating our time and a share of our profits to projects such as the one for the Edmond’s Lutheran Church and Annie’s Community Kitchen,” said Reeves Clippard, Co-Founder of A&R Solar.

2016 Churchwide Assembly Passes Memorial To Move Towards A Responsible Energy Future

2016 Churchwide Assembly Passes Memorial To Move Towards A Responsible Energy Future

During the months leading up to the August 2016 ELCA Churchwide Assembly, a group of people promoted memorials to suggest that the church divest from fossil fuels and/or invest in renewable energy, and worked to ensure that the issue was properly discussed by voting members.
Read their position paper and follow their efforts as reported on our Facebook page  See also information on Key differences between divestment and shareholder advocacy
We still have a ways to go – but with the advocacy office, Portico, and a handful of dedicated “restorers of creation” progress is being made.
 

From minutes of Plenary 8 session – August 13th, which can be found in full here.

MEMORIAL B3:

To receive with gratitude the memorials of the Saint Paul Area, Metropolitan New York, Northeastern Pennsylvania, Upper Susquehanna and Northwestern Pennsylvania synods related to climate change and fossil fuels;

To urge all ELCA members, congregations and synods to inform and educate themselves about the effects of climate change through the lens of the “Caring for Creation: Vision, Hope and Justice” social statement, and to advocate for policies that reduce energy use and our dependence on fossil fuels and encourage development of renewable energy sources as an expression of our commitment to address climate change and caring for God’s creation;

To affirm the action of the 2013 Churchwide Assembly and subsequent action of the Church Council in 2014 related to the development of revised or additional investment screens on fossil fuels, and to support and commend ELCA members, congregations, synods, the churchwide organization, and related institutions and agencies such as ELCA Endowment Fund and Portico Benefit Services for their leadership efforts to invest in companies that are taking steps toward a sustainable environment;

To affirm Portico’s balanced approach to supporting this church’s principles and directives as stated in the social statements — including the commitment to help transition to an economy less dependent on fossil fuels.

That approach includes has included:

1. shareholder advocacy (filing and supporting resolutions on environmental issues, including 150 resolutions in 2015),

2. focused investment screening, which has identified 113 companies screened for environmental reasons, and

3. ramping up positive social investments, such as investments in companies that develop solar, wind and water power generation systems, repurposing waste products and reducing toxic emissions;

and now:

To call upon Portico to evaluate the viability of an optional fossil -free fund for retirement plan participants; and To call upon the ELCA to heed the call of the Lutheran World Federation Council in 2015 to member churches “not to invest in fossil fuels and to support energy efficiency and renewable energy companies, and to encourage their institutions and individual members to do likewise”; and

As part of this church’s response to the Lutheran World Federation’s call, to request that the ELCA churchwide organization review the ELCA’s applicable social teachings and Corporate Social Responsibility policies and procedures, with the goal of not investing in, and removing the largest fossil fuel companies as identified by Carbon Tracker, and investing in corporations which are taking positive steps toward a sustainable environment.

 

 

 

 

Stewarding the Gift of Water: ELCA Advocacy Fact Sheet

Theological background and information on water stewardship globally, nationally, and locally. Under the “Find Your Watershed” section of the Factsheet you can click on the link to the USEPA site and input your zip code and you will be able to locate your watershed.
or go to the ELCA Advocacy Resources page.

Congregational Covenant and Organizing Kit

What can you do? 

AFFIRM: Personally, with your church council, or entire synod, review our ELCA’s 1993 call to action and commit to engaging in steps to live into that calling.  Sign and submit the Covenant with Creation to be part of our accountability and celebration network.

ACT TOGETHER:  Reach out to all church members and share the ideas listed specifically for the area/committee they already work on: Action Plan Ideas.  Goals without specific people and dates may remain elusive. Use this form and our ELCA network to help make a path.

Use the online version of the Organizing Kit to the right or download the pdf here: Congregational Self-Organizing Kit

NOTE: We often make updates in the resources and connections. Please refer back online often and let us know if you have any suggestions!